4 min read

Waterfall vs. Agile: Choosing the Right Methodology | Praecipio Consulting

By Bryce Lord on Aug 26, 2021 2:52:58 PM

Blogpost-DisplayImage-August copy_Waterfall vs. Agile- Choosing the Right Methodology

Waterfall and Agile are both process methodologies with very different approaches to achieving the same goal: developing high-quality products. Where Waterfall focuses on strict requirements and planning, Agile provides a more adaptable approach where it's much easier to adjust requirements and timelines as the product develops. Both methods have their pros and cons, hopefully this article will help clear up which one is right for your project!

What is Waterfall?

Waterfall is a linear and sequential process methodology. It breaks up projects into several distinct phases, with a complete product being delivered only after the final phase is successfully finished. An example of these phases may be something like: 

Requirements > Design > Development > Testing > Implementation

These phases are completed in order, where all tasks associated with that respective phase are complete before the next phase can begin. The teams required in each phase can be distinct, and may require only slight overlap between phases. Both the customer requirements and timeline are established early on within the product development life-cycle. The Waterfall methodology really excels when product requirements are strict, and the goal is to provide complete product within a specified timeframe and budget.

Blogpost-DisplayImage-August copy_Diagram-phases

As someone that comes from a background developing manufacturing processes, the waterfall methodology was basically a way of life. Every new product life cycle began with Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) and its phases:

Planning > Product Design & Development > Process Design & Development > Product & Process Validation > Production

These processes are followed in order, with a review at the end of each phase by their respective team. In most cases, shortly after beginning production for one project, the planning phase for the next project would already have started, and so on. The strict product requirements, tight deadlines and long lead times to design and build manufacturing equipment lends itself well to waterfall. Lead times for manufacturing equipment can range anywhere from 3 months to over a year depending on complexity, so establishing clear product requirements early is imperative. Any change to the product or process requirements could result in extreme delays to the project.

Pros

  • Project timelines, budget and progress are easier to manage and measure throughout distinct phases.
  • More hands-off for customers after initial requirements and timelines are established.
  • Detailed documentation is more readily available.

Cons

  • Need strict requirements very early on, changes to these requirements can be costly.
  • Less overlap and communication between teams makes collaboration more difficult.
  • The testing phase occurs much later in the project, so any issues found can be expensive and delay projects drastically.
  • Distinct teams, rigid timelines and budget constraints make it difficult to move back to a previous phase if issues arise.

What is Agile?

Agile is an iterative and highly adaptable process methodology. Agile focuses on breaking down projects into small product releases that can then be iterated on to make improvements. These iterations go through all phases of a project simultaneously. This allows a team member to be testing out one feature, while another is designing a different feature. With all of the phases of a project moving simultaneous, having a fully cross-functional team engaged throughout each iteration is imperative. After each iteration is complete, clients can review the most recent release and set priorities and goals for the team in the following iterations. The Agile methodology excels when requirements may need to adapt as the customer's needs develop, and there aren't strict requirements for timeframe and budget.

Blogpost-DisplayImage-August copy_Diagram-2

Software development is one of the key uses for the Agile methodology. With new product requirements frequently coming up and an on-going timeline for completion, breaking the project down into continually improving iterations is a much better way to control changes. With each new iteration, clients will find new beneficial features they'd like implemented, and these feature requests will be turned into tasks to be planned for future iterations. The average time for an iteration is usually between 1 and 4 weeks, so clients frequently get a look at the current state of the product and are able to evaluate priorities for future iterations accordingly. Agile works incredibly well when requirements are not fully established up front, which is usually the case with software development projects.

Pros

  • Highly adaptable and works well when customer requirements are not completely established up front.
  • Fully cross-functional teams promote higher collaboration than distinct teams.
  • Frequent customer communication helps ensure requirements are being met and customer satisfaction is high.
  • Testing is performed concurrently with development during each iteration, leading to faster identification and correction of issues.

Cons

  • Tracking timelines, budget and project progress is more difficult across multiple iterations.
  • Additional iterations can lead to lengthened timelines and increased budget.
  • Documentation is usually lacking between iterations.

At Praecipio Consulting, we have more than 15 years of experience helping clients big and small become the best version of themselves; if you have questions on Waterfall, Agile, or any other process methodology, reach out and let us know, we'd love to help!

Topics: devops methodology project-management agile frameworks waterfall
1 min read

The Democratization of Process: BPM + Cloud

By Praecipio Consulting on Aug 3, 2011 11:00:00 AM

We were reminded of Phil Gilbert’s 2010 keynote, “The Democratization of Process,” earlier today while fine-tuning an integration of business process management (BPM) methodology and cloud technology. If you’re pondering the clash of governance vs crowd-sourced content, Gilbert’s keynote (below) offers some helpful perspective.

 

 

 

BPM 2010 Keynote: Phil Gilbert – The Next Decade of BPM from Michael zur Muehlenon Vimeo.

Topics: blog bpm business management process technology cloud methodology
2 min read

Jira + ITIL Working Together

By Praecipio Consulting on Jun 24, 2011 11:00:00 AM

Atlassian Jira's a remarkably flexible tool. For most who hear “Jira,” things like issue tracking, project management, and software development come to mind. Very rarely do people think of ITIL in relation to Jira. But then again, many don’t know what ITIL is.

If you’re a developer or in IT and don’t know what ITIL is, you should. It’s a set of processes for managing lifecycles with relationships to one another. It’s the most widely-accepted approach to IT service management in the world – a set of best practices drawn from public and private sectors around the world. ITIL doesn’t just apply to IT service management (ITSM), though – it’s a reliable methodology for managing any type of complex technological process.

Jira’s an Atlassian tool that’s phenomenal at lifecycle management (workflows, custom fields, etc). It’s designed to be issue-centric, built around managing issues or bugs that pop up within a product or service’s lifecycle. This functionality extends far and wide when you expand how you define an “issue.” On the surface, an issue is more like a problem – but considering an issue’s attributes, it can easily qualify as a task or milestone. With that in mind, Jira can facilitate far more than simple issue tracking. It can support complex process lifecycles.

Every process is a web of highly dependent relationships between regular and conditional tasks – including ITIL processes like Incident Management and Problem Management. The huge breakthrough here is making Jira projects and workflows represent (and support) ITIL processes. Let’s take an incident for example. An incident goes through several states:

(1) detection and recording
(2) classification and initial support
(3) investigation and diagnosis
(4) incident closure

A good Incident Management process within a good technology helps reduce meantime to recovery – i.e. recover from an incident. We all know how well Jira facilitates transitions and workflow. Let’s take it a step further…in ITIL-based Incident Management, we are supposed to designate incident ownership, actively monitor, track and communicate. BINGO! This what Jira does.

Let’s take this another step further. Problem Management is a process used to identify root cause to reduce the number of incidents – thereby increasing the meantime between failures. Using Jira, we can manage root cause analysis and associate the individual incidents (manifestations) back to the Problem Management record we’re analyzing. This ability to link records and collaborate makes Jira a great Problem Management solution. Add Confluence to the mix and the effectiveness is improved further.

Going another step further – having ITIL-based ITSM processes running in Jira alongside your organizations SDLC further helps IT align its capabilities to deliver the highest, best quality software and service delivery.

We’ve helped clients implement Jira to manage Incident Management, Change Management, Problem Management, Asset Management, Software Development, Testing… we love the Altassian products and so do our clients.

Topics: jira atlassian blog asset-management confluence issues management problem process reliability sdlc services software workflows tracking change development incident-management it itil itsm lifecycle methodology bespoke

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