4 min read

7 Step Jira Upgrade Process

By Kristopher Hall on Oct 1, 2019 2:33:00 PM

Dreading the process of an Atlassian Jira software upgrade? Depending on how many issues you have and how large your instance is, we get it - it’s overwhelming.

Below are a list of steps to help walk you through the process of achieving a successful Jira software upgrade so that you can be free of bug fixes, access new features, and operate with improved performance. Keep in mind that every situation is different, so you may need to follow additional steps in order to meet the needs of your environment.

Jira-Upgrade-Process

Step 1: Evaluate the Backend

The first part of the upgrade process is checking to see if the current backend of Jira is going to be supported - backend platforms such as your java version, operating system version, and most importantly - the version of your database. If the backend is not supported, you're going to have to upgrade/downgrade it in order to align yourself with the correct version that's supported for that version of Jira. You can learn more about supported platforms via Atlassian’s documentation

Step 2: Validate Upgrade Path

Once you've identified the support platforms of your system, the next step is to validate the upgrade path. For instance, if you are running Jira Service Desk, previous versions of Jira before 6.9 require an upgrade path to 7.0 before upgrading to 7.1 and higher.

Step 3: Test, Test, Test

It's important to make sure that the upgrade you're performing isn't going to break your production system. Start with creating a new test machine and completing a refresh of production. This will help you identify any unforeseen issues with the upgrade.

Once you have your test environment established, the next step is to run through the test upgrade. You'll want to create a runbook that can be reused for your production system. Power off the application, take a snapshot, and back up the database. Powering off the application first allows you to get a complete backup of the system.

Step 4: Add-ons

The next step is powering on your system and validating the add-ons. The add-ons page, located under the system settings, has an upgrade checker that allows you to validate which add-ons are supported under the version you're upgrading to. It will provide a list showing which add-ons are Incompatible, Compatible if Upgraded, Compatible, and Unknown (in this order). You'll want to disable all add-ons except for the ones that appear on the list as Compatible. This ensures that the upgrade process will not fail due to unsupported plugins.

Step 5: Upgrade your Production

After disabling all required add-ons, you can shut off the application and perform the upgrade installation. Download the bin file of the new version and run it. It will either ask you if you want to install a new version of the application or upgrade a current installation (which it will default to if detected). It will also ask if you want a backup of the home directory. If you've taken a snapshot in a previous step, this backup is not necessary. The upgrade installation will also identify any changes to configuration files, i.e, server.xml changes for proxy information and setenv.sh changes for added heap size or extra arguments. After the installation is complete, you will need to reapply these changes.

Step 6: Validation 

When the installation of the bin file completes, you can start up the application and the application will make the required upgrade changes in the database. When the application comes up, you can validate the application state as well as re-enable and upgrade any disabled add-ons in the previous steps.

Step 7: Post-Upgrade

As a final step, it's always a good idea to do an integrity check of the database and a reindex of the application. 

Upgrade Complete

Congratulations, your upgrade is now complete! We strongly suggest not to wait until it is too late to upgrade your software and risk damaging your production system. It is crucial to protect your software from any potential security threats or lingering bugs in your system. You also don’t want to miss out on any new features that can help drive business growth and maximize ROI.

Praecipio Consulting works with companies across different industries and realize Jira Software is an instrumental part, not just within IT teams, but across the entire business operation. Read how we helped a fortune 20 medical supply company migrate and consolidate their Confluence and Jira instances. To ensure Jira is performing in an optimal manner, our Atlassian experts at Praecipio Consulting can help you execute a smooth and seamless Jira software upgrade. Feel free to contact us should you need any help. 

 

 

Topics: jira blog how-to migrations upgrade jira-software marketplace-apps
2 min read

How Confluence and Jira Make Your Life Easy

By Cindy Smith on Sep 10, 2019 11:46:00 AM

An essential part of a successful organization is communication: open and direct lines of communication ensure that team members react swiftly and effectively. In regards to software and applications, different teams have different needs and collaborating can sometimes feel like speaking in different languages. The reality is, development teams live in one application and business teams live in another.  

The good news is, it’s ok. Your teams can live in different applications. 

How Does Jira Integrate with Confluence?

Atlassian Confluence and Jira integrate effortlessly to address the persistent problem of working in different applications. Through the use of macros, Confluence gives you the ability to display Jira issues on a page, making it simple to create release notes, status reports, etc. You can also write product requirements in Confluence and quickly create Jira issues in seconds.  

Confluence-Jira-work-together

How Does Jira and Confluence Work Together? 

We commonly hear statements such as, "Our company is doing a great job tracking tasks through their lifecycle with Jira, but it's incredibly difficult to find the product requirements and the test cases being tested”, or “HR processed a new hire but we can’t find the original job posting or any of the received resumes associated with that new role”. Finding the associated documentation requires emails to be sent to numerous people (including but not limited to: product managers, product owners, HR personnel, administrators, etc) and digging through emails, GoogleSheets or even <gasp> Microsoft Word documents! And for times that you couldn’t find the original, how many times have you re-created the documentation or found an old version and hope that it would suffice? These are everyday problems in most organizations: Time is wasted duplicating efforts or searching for things that should be easy to find. Imagine what you could’ve completed if you had that time back. 

The integration between Jira and Confluence is much more than a pretty face:

  • It's seamless, making it easy to create automatic linking between the feature and the product requirements.

  • It allows for documentation to live perpetually and not be stuck in a comment box with a stale feature or HR requisition. 

  • It gives you one place for everything - no more searching your inbox, chat history, internal drives. 

  • It allows collaborative editing: multiple people editing a document together. 

  • It has Page and Space restrictions to allow for additional security when needed. 

  • It breaks down the barriers between teams when everyone is using the same overarching suite for working.

Jira and Confluence Better Together

Imagine being able to release with confidence, knowing your project is tracking on time, and ultimately giving your users the ability to find what they are looking for - faster. If you’re frustrated with disparate applications, contact us and let us make your life easier with Confluence and Jira. 

Topics: jira blog confluence how-to integration
2 min read

How to Solve Too Many Jira Email Notifications

By Praecipio Consulting on Aug 20, 2019 8:03:00 PM

“Jira sends too many emails.”

When I tell people I consult on the Atlassian suite, this is usually one of their first comments. I’ve worked with many clients who set up filters in their inboxes just to reduce the amount of Jira emails they see. 

Getting Jira to send fewer emails is actually surprisingly simple. Here are 3 ways to do it effectively:

How to Create a Jira Notification Scheme

If you’re receiving too many emails from Jira, the first place to look is the notification scheme. Notification schemes tell Jira when to send a notification and to which recipient. For example, an effective best practice is to send an email to the Assignee when an issue is created. A good Jira environment, except in rare cases, will only alert users who are directly involved in the issue, such as the Assignee, Watchers, and the Reporter. 

To check your notification scheme, go to Project Settings, and then to Notifications. Make sure to note if the scheme is being used by any other projects so you don’t accidentally change any of that project’s settings.

Check if Add-ons are Sending Emails 

Automation for Jira (one of my all-time favorite Jira add-ons), Enterprise Mail Handler for Jira, or JEMH as it’s commonly known, as well as a host of other add-ons in the Atlassian ecosystem can be configured to send emails. This is a commonly used practice to get highly specific emails to a targeted audience. Visit the Add-ons (also known as Apps in some later versions) portion of the Jira Administration page and check out the configuration of these add-ons. You may find that there are outdated, redundant, or unnecessary rules resulting in extra emails.

A good way to recognize an email from an add-on is that it will typically not look like a regular Jira email. It may have different formatting, include different pieces of information, or have a note describing which add-on sent it.

Batch your Email Notifications

Starting in the Jira 8 version, Jira notifications can be batched. Batching email notifications means that changes within the same ten minute period will trigger a single email. Therefore, if a user updates an issue field, then adds a comment, then adds an attachment to the same issue within a ten minute time frame, only one Jira notification email will be sent, instead of three. You can read more about this behavior on the Atlassian Support confluence.

No Need to Stop Emails from Jira

Atlassian Jira can easily be an important application that is part of your daily workflow. Don’t let Jira take over your inbox - With these simple steps, you can take control of your Jira email notifications (and your sanity). 

Interested in more Jira tips? Check out our blog “Guide to Import Linked Issues into Jira from CSV”.

Topics: jira blog best-practices how-to email-notifications
3 min read

What is DevOps? 3 Steps to Becoming a DevOps Organization

By Amanda Babb on Jan 8, 2019 2:04:00 PM

What is DevOps?

Before we go into depth about the three phases required to fully operate as a DevOps organization, you must first understand DevOps, which has become an increasingly important framework in organizations. DevOps refers to a set of best practices that empower both the operations and development teams to perform more efficiently, exceed organizational goals, and drive long-term business strategy. 

Regarding the steps to achieve DevOps, I often find myself asking our clients, "What part of DevOps are you focusing on right now?" The response I usually get is, "Well, all of it." And while this is a valid answer, there are three key parts of the framework that you must consider when making the transition. Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, and Continuous Deployment are the three steps to becoming a mature DevOps organization. Let's take a closer look at each of them and how they can assist you in your DevOps journey: 

Continuous Integration 

Commit early; commit often. Build early; build often. Test early; test often. Merge early, merge often. That's it. Teams should constantly commit, build, test, and merge code. In a Scrum Team, these units of work are the Stories which the Product Owner will accept as complete, but they may require manual intervention to merge. Breaking down work into small increments is critical to ensuring Continuous Integration best practices. The first step in creating a solid CI/CD pipeline is to work with your teams, at least once per day, to simplify their tasks, as well as the development and testing processes, into consumable pieces. While you may already have a great DVCS tool, building and testing automation tools that support these practices are critical as well. With the Atlassian product suite, teams can easily manage these processes, even down to assigning who buys the doughnuts when the build breaks. 

Continuous Delivery

While often confused with Continuous Deployment, Continuous Delivery focuses on environments. Continuous Delivery means that if the merged code passes its automated tests, it can automatically deploy to a production-like Staging environment. Typically, additional steps, such as integration testing and security testing, will also take place in the Staging environment. Change Requests are filed, and if approved, the code is pushed to Production, along with other changes that may or may not be related. While changes are automatically delivered to Stage, changes are "manually" deployed to Production. As the organization matures with Continuous Delivery, automating the creation of Change Requests when code is delivered to the Staging environment means faster approvals and delivery to Production. When implementing DevOps, some organizations end their journey here. Regulatory compliance, including SOX, may prevent organizations from moving beyond the Continuous Delivery step, even though they still consider themselves a DevOps organization. 

Continuous Deployment

Continuous Deployment refers to code being in the hands of end-users continuously and in a safe and sustainable way. The series of commits, builds, tests, and merges (all throughout the process), means that code can go from the commit phase to functioning in Production in just minutes, as opposed to days or weeks. Real-time monitoring, test coverage that challenges your code base, and lightweight release notes all play a role in Continuous Deployment, which is why teams must be aware of their test coverage metrics and embrace testing as part of their day-to-day responsibilities.Teams can no longer support the "throw-it-over-the-wall" model when development is deployed to Production. In fact, the most successful teams support their code in Production, in addition to developing new functionality for their end-users. How? Because ownership of the business objective to the value delivered to the client is supported not only by the process and tools, but also by the teams' dedication to relentless improvement. 

DevOps: A Systems Approach

Struggling with embracing true DevOps? Because each of these steps builds on one another, it becomes critical to take a step back and review the system as a whole. While many organizations want to get to DevOps, common pitfalls may include lack of Test-Driven Development, extreme separation of duties, Story sizing, or even lack of tooling integrations. If you're struggling to advance from Continuous Integration to Continuous Delivery to Continuous Deployment, it may be time to review your entire development, testing, delivery, and deployment processes to ensure that they support the DevOps journey. At Praecipio Consulting, we guide organizations to embrace a true DevOps framework and help them implement the right tools and processes in order to support a full DevOps deployment, regardless of the industry. 

Topics: devops how-to
7 min read

A Guide on How to Import Linked Issues into Jira from CSV

By Morgan Folsom on Nov 6, 2018 6:24:00 PM

This resource is for you if you've read Atlassian's documentation but are still confused on how to import linked issues.

Using the external system importer, Jira admins are able to import CSV spreadsheets into Jira to create new issues or update existing ones. This guide is an overview on how to use the External System Importer to create issue links. Note: This is not a comprehensive guide. Before reviewing this information you should understand Atlassian's guide on importing data from CSV. 

Requirements

Your file must meet the basic requirements described in the above-mentioned Atlassian reference material. For the different link types, any additional prerequisites are outlined below. 

How it works

When importing, each issue is assigned a unique ID, which is used when creating links. This ID can be the Issue Key, the Issue Id, or any Unique Identifier that you choose. Once the issues have been identified, you can link them in a variety of ways. 

What should I use for an ID?

  • Issue Key - Use this if the issue already exists in Jira. This is easiest if you are using data exported from Jira, as links export with Issue Key.
  • Other Unique Identifier - If the issue you're referencing doesn't exist in Jira yet, this is your option, which is particularly useful if you're importing linked data from another system that already has an ID assigned.

Examples

Sub-tasks and Parents

To create a sub-task/parent link, you use the Issue Id and Parent Id fields. Issue Id and Parent Id should each have their own columns in the spreadsheet. You can use whichever ID type you have decided on. In the below example, the issues are assigned consecutive numbers as IDs. This will work with any sub-task type issue types.

The spreadsheet should look something like this:

Issue Key
Issue Type
Summary
Issue ID
Parent ID
SCRUM-1 Story Ability to reserve an item for 2 hrs and return to it later 1  
SCRUM-2 Sub-task Create unit tests 2 1

When mapping the CSV columns to the fields:

Sub task and parent mapping in Jira

Importing Standard Link Types

If all of the issues in the spreadsheet are new (i.e., they do not exist in JIRA yet), you do not need to include an Issue Key. 

When importing issues using standard issue links (Epics, blocks, duplicates, etc.), you will follow a similar structure as before. You will still map Issue ID to a unique identifier, but instead of using Parent Id, you will use the specific link type. Each link type requires its own column, as shown below, allowing you to import multiple types of links at once. 

If any of the issues already exist in Jira, be sure to enter a value into the Issue Key field. You can import issues in any combination: whether all, some, or none of the issues already existing in Jira. 

Issue Key
Issue Type
Summary
Issue ID
Link "blocks"
Link "relates"
  Story As an admin, I'd like to import issues into Jira 123 456  
  Story As an admin, I'd like to link Jira issues 456   123

When mapping the CSV columns to the fields:

Importing standard link types in Jira

Here's an example of what one of the newly imported issues above looks like:

newly imported issues

It is important to note that Portfolio for Jira's parent linking functions differently than the standard issue links. Portfolio for Jira uses a custom field "Parent Link" to create the connection, and for this reason, it has different requirements for importing. 

For these links, you'll need to use the Issue Key, otherwise the field will not recognize any other IDs, which means that the issues must exist in Jira before you can create a Portfolio parent link via import. In this case, there needs to be a column with Issue Keys mapped to the Parent Link field. Note that all hierarchy levels above Epic use this same field, so you can have only one column. However, the Portfolio hierarchy must be respected; if you try to link an Initiative directly to a Story, for example, you will receive an error on import. 

The example below shows what it might look like if your hierarchy was configured as: Initiative - Epic - Story. The Epic would be linked to the initiative using the Parent Link field, but the Story is linked to the Epic through the Epic link. 

Issue Key
Issue Type
Summary
Link "Epic"
Parent Link
SCRUM-1 Story Make the server more efficient SCRUM-2  
SCRUM-2 Epic Blazing-fast server   SCRUM-3
SCRUM-3 Initiative World Class Product Experience    

 

Once imported, the issues appear in Portfolio like this:

Imported issues in Jira Portfolio

Now it's your turn to Import and Link!

Once you have your file prepped as described above, you can import issue links into Jira. If you run into any trouble, be sure to check:

  1. Your mappings -  Are the correct columns mapped to the right fields?
  2. Field values - Do I have the right values?
  3. IDs - Have I used the right type of ID mapping? 

As always, before importing large files, be sure to start with small amounts of data and test regularly. 

 

Now that you have your imported issues linked, feel free to check praecipio.com for other helpful tips on using the Atlassian tools.

Topics: jira atlassian blog how-to portfolio tips
3 min read

Using Version Control in SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Sep 23, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

Listen to the video or read along below:

Some of you may remember when shared drives were a revolutionary way of sharing documents throughout a company. Business documents were stored on a drive within a massive tree of folders that most employees could access. The problem with shared drives was that whoever edited a document last won – and by that I mean if Joe in accounting and Sue in management were editing the same document, there was no way for them to know if anyone else was editing it at the same time. So if Sue saved the document and overwrote it on the shared drive, and Joe finished and saved it an hour later, Joe’s version would become the document – and all Sue’s work would be lost, resulting in wasted time, wasted money, and…well, extreme frustration.

This is why SharePoint‘s version control is so useful. Here’s how it works in a document library. Click on Settings, then Document Library Settings. // Here, under General Settings, click Versioning Settings. // Here’s where you’ll set this up. Content Approval’s asking if you want to approve or reject submitted documents or changes – you would want to do this if you didn’t want everyone with access to the library to see approved, pending, and rejected drafts…for this example, I’ll turn this off for the sake of simplicity. Document Version History is want we really want here. I want a new version to be created every time I update a document – and I want the old versions of the document to remain available in case I mess up and need to revert to a previous version. Right now, No Versioning is selected – so I’ll change that. I can choose major versions or minor versions. I recommend major and minor versions for precision – if someone merely changes the punctuation in the document, I don’t want the document to jump from 2.0 to 3.0.

Below, I can choose how many older versions to keep on file. 2.0s and 3.0s are considered Major Versions, while 2.1.1s and 3.1.1s are considered minor or “drafts.”

Draft Item Security lets you choose who can see every version of a document. You can choose to extend this visibility to anyone who can read items in the library, to those with editing capabilities, or only to users who approve changes. I’m not requiring an approval process for this library, so I can’t choose the last option – but I’ll choose only those who can edit documents, since those are the people likely to be on the team with access to this library.

Lastly, Requiring Check Out is very important. Checking out a document to edit it tells the rest of the world you’re editing that document – if you don’t do that, you revert to the shared drive scenario I mentioned earlier. I’m selecting “yes” here to require my team to check out a document to edit it. You can learn how to check documents in and out in a separate videoblog.

So now let’s test this…let’s say we need to update our Worker’s Comp Form. I’ll click Edit in Microsoft Word – notice I’m “about to check out and edit this” – // and in Word, I’ll make the changes. Now I’ll check in the document – and notice it’s asking me what type of version I’m checking in. These were minor edits, so I’m checking in a minor version or draft – so I’ll select that, and let people know what I did…then click OK.

Now I can click on the Version History of this document and see my latest version here. If I click the drop-down arrow, I can choose to view or unpublish my version – or restore the version below. I can also delete all minor versions – all the small drafts – and keep major ones, the 2.0s and 3.0s, to make things simpler.

That’s the scoop on versioning. Visit our blog for more.

Topics: how-to library sharepoint videos control documentation microsoft
2 min read

How SharePoint Quick Launch Works

By Praecipio Consulting on Aug 23, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

 

 

One of the most important things to consider when designing a SharePoint site – or designing any site – is creating easy and intuitive access to data with logical organization. In SharePoint, it’s useful to store frequently-viewed pages, lists, and libraries in the Quick Launch bar on the left side of the page.

The Quick Launch bar allows you to quickly navigate to pages you commonly need. Here we have landing pages that aggregate related data and furthermore may limit data to those things that are important to the specific user logged inYour SharePoint developer determines which pages, lists, and libraries appear in the Quick Launch bar. It’s important to not consider the Quick Launch bar as a site index – remember, not all pages, lists, and libraries of your SharePoint site…unless your site is very, very small…should appear in the Quick Launch bar. Only those needed frequently should be stored there.

The Quick Launch bar can be specific for every site or sub-site in SharePoint. A quick etymology lesson: we’re working inside a sub-site right now. This Demo sub-site is a sub-site of our main SharePoint site, titled Brothers Lane Collaboration Site – as you see in the top left. Sites may divide into sub-sites, and sub-sites may divide into pages. There is only a Home page on our Demo sub-site. If there were another page, titled Sales or Legal Matters, etc, you’d see it here. So the Quick Launch menu can vary from site to site or sub-site to sub-site, but not from page to page. All pages on a site or subsite will have the same Quick Launch menu.

You can add a library or list to the Quick Launch bar by using the Settings tab, as you see here in Test Library B, and clicking on Title, Description and Navigation. Here you see the option to “display in Quick Launch.” I’ll select yes…and here you see Test Library B in the Quick Launch.

Find other SharePoint how-to’s and learn more on our blog.

Topics: efficiency enterprise how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos collaboration
1 min read

Introduction to SharePoint for End-Users

By Praecipio Consulting on Aug 10, 2010 11:00:00 AM

There are many browser-based business productivity apps to choose from. Some help you manage projects. Some are accounting tools. Others enable you to share and edit documents. Few applications, however, allow you to do all of the above.

Microsoft SharePoint is one of those tools. And SharePoint doesn’t only do “all of the above” – it handles anything from serving as an address book to automatically finding, logging, and articulating key performance measurements from every area of an enterprise. It’s fully customizable, and lets users build in unique operations that fit their business needs. You can make SharePoint fit you.

Think of SharePoint as a concrete foundation. While other web tools that serve one business need are like pre-built homes, SharePoint is an empty lot upon which you can build whatever is best for you. Why buy seven houses you have to adjust your needs to fit when you could buy one that’s designed to fit you? In this scenario, you can start out with the basic bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen, and build out as your business grows. As your business starts offering more services and acquiring more employees, you can add on metaphorical bedrooms and garages as the needs arise. You can even build a storage shed in the backyard.

SharePoint is a foundation for business that consolidates the things that make your business run – data, documents, processes, collaboration – into one software. It puts every part of your organization on common ground. While an employee in a company’s legal department may use SharePoint to store documents, a developer in IT may use it to create workflow that automatically documents sales transactions in a custom database. The software benefits BPM, CRM, ITSM, and every other kind of “M” by saving employees time.

The take-away here is that SharePoint is a highly-scalable tool that all employees can benefit from by using it for every-day business operations. The more you invest in the software, the more you get out of it – likewise, the more a business invests in SharePoint, the more money it saves over time from using SharePoint to promote efficiency. 

Topics: blog automation bpm business how-to management process project sharepoint
2 min read

SharePoint Orientation

By Praecipio Consulting on Jul 14, 2010 11:00:00 AM

This text mirrors what you’ll hear in the video.

SharePoint provides a common framework for helping you do your work efficiently and effectively, and to improve communications between you and your colleagues. This introductory video is intended to provide you with a base understanding of Microsoft SharePoint – so we’ll cover the terminology you need to know to make your way around the software.

We’ll start with Lists. Within SharePoint, data is organized in to collections called Lists. Lists are like a table in a database or an Excel worksheet in that they contain many individual records or rows.
List attributes are shown as column headings, as you see here. They help distinguish list items from one another.

A list item is a discrete record within a list that has the same attributes as every other list item in that list. These attributes can be of many types including, but not limited to, numbers, strings, dates, files, and system users. It should be noted that file attributes are attachments to the list item.

The next important term you need to know is Document Library. Document Libraries, like Lists, are collections of data – but unlike Lists, Document Libraries are meant to be a repository for documents, including Word Documents, Excel Spreadsheets, etc. As you see, this library is already populated with some documents. The attributes of those documents are shown again as column headings.

A Document Library Item is a discrete record, and more importantly, a discrete document. Each document in the document library will have the same attributes as other documents in the library – though each document may have a different template. You can create a templates for files within your document library – and select one to use for a new document in the New tab. Two important features to note are:

  • Number one, the Document Control feature, which allows a single editor to check out a document to edit it, thereby restricting access to only one user at a time. Permissions can be given to users to allow for read-only or more restricted permissions.
  • Number two is Document Versioning, which allows for changes made to the document to be tracked over time.

The next term is Workflow. A Workflow is a packaged set of instructions that can be executed in a repeatable fashion for any given List Item or Document Library Item. Workflows may be executed automatically by the system on the creation or modification of a list or library item, or manually by the user.

The button you see here shows where to access Workflows for this List Item. You can see it by using the drop down and on the display form. Note that not all lists will have workflows associated with them. Only workflows that are manually executable will be displayed here.

The next term is View. All Lists and Document Libraries present the information contained within them by using Views. Views are similar to a simple database query where you can specify what kind of records you want to see (filtering) and how they should be presented (grouping and sorting).

Here I’m showing a view of Test List A using the All Items by Status view. You can select a different view – even a custom view you create – in this box in the upper right of your screen.

The last term is Web Part. Web parts are sections of a web page meant to share related information. These web parts can have many uses throughout a web site.

Here I’m showing a Web Part within the display form for a Test List A item. This web part shows only those documents where the related Test List A Item is the same as the list item being displayed above.

Now you’re familiar with the foundational elements of SharePoint. Our how-to videos will show you how to perform basic user and developer-level operations using these elements.

Topics: how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos

How to Build a List in SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Jul 8, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

1. Click SITE ACTIONS in upper right
2. Click CREATE
3. Click CUSTOM LIST in fourth column
4. Name list and assign attributes
5. Click CREATE 

Topics: how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos
1 min read

How to Check Documents In and Out in SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Jul 1, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

Method One:


1. Click the drop-down arrow on the document
2. Click CHECK OUT
3. Open document for editing by clicking the drop-down menu
4. Click EDIT IN MICROSOFT WORD
5. Edit document
6. In Word, click the top left menu
7. Under PUBLISH, click CHECK IN
8. Enter latest version comments
9. Click CHECK IN or OK

Method Two:

1. Click document name in SharePoint
2. Select EDIT, click OK
3. In Word, click top left menu
4. Under PUBLISH, click CHECK OUT
5. Edit document
6. Under PUBLISH, click CHECK IN
7. Enter latest version comments
8. Click CHECK IN or OK

You can always correct any mistakes by closing your document and checking in/out from the SharePoint page. 

Topics: how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos

How to Customize a SharePoint Document Library

By Praecipio Consulting on Jun 17, 2010 11:00:00 AM

Add FOLDERS and/or ATTRIBUTES to make your SharePoint library easier to navigate.

To add folders, click NEW, and then NEW FOLDER.

Topics: how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos

How to Create a Document Library in SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Jun 10, 2010 11:00:00 AM

1. Click SITE ACTIONS button in upper right
2. Click CREATE
3. Click DOCUMENT LIBRARY, top of left column
4. Name/assign settings
5. Click CREATE

 

Topics: how-to sharepoint tips tricks videos

How to Upload Documents to SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Jun 10, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

 

1. Click UPLOAD tab
2. Click UPLOAD DOCUMENT or UPLOAD MULTIPLE DOCUMENTS
3. Find and select desired documents from your system
4. Click UPLOAD
5. Name and assign attributes
6. Click OK

More SharePoint how-to’s on our blog or on our YouTube channel.

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