3 min read

GreenHopper 5.8 Now Available: Rapid Board for Kanban

By Praecipio Consulting on Oct 19, 2011 11:00:00 AM

GreenHopper 5.8 is now available, delivering a huge win for everyone: the new Rapid Board.

A major innovation for GreenHopper, the Rapid Board’s a flexible new board for managing and reporting on work in progress. The Rapid Board also provides multiple project support, which alone satisfies a whopping 255 votes - the most requested feature in GreenHopper’s history!

What’s the Rapid Board?

The Rapid Board provides a new way to view issues in GreenHopper by creating Rapid Views.  Creating new Rapid Views is simple:

  1. Save a Jira search
  2. Layout status columns
  3. Set Swimlanes & Quick Filters

This brilliant simplicity calls upon the most powerful search in issue tracking: Jira’s Query Language (JQL). The power of Jira’s advanced search is behind every aspect of the new GreenHopper Rapid Board. The Rapid View, horizontal Swimlanes, and button Quick Filters are all based on JQL search parameters:

This means large teams can collaborate on a single Rapid View, while individuals can use Swimlanes and Quick Filters to see just the issues that matter most to them.

Work Smarter

The new Rapid Board has several smart features in the background. Atlassian’s focused this first release of the Rapid Board on Kanban-specific features, and will continue to work on features for Scrum and all types agile teams as the Rapid Board evolves.

  • Kanban presets: an Expedite swimlane, 3 Quick Filters, default columns (To Do, In Progress, Done), and issues ordered by Global Rank.
  • Permanent links mean ‘what you see is what they get’ when emailing or IM’ing URLs – and include not only you exact view, but also the selected issue or report.
  • Keyboard shortcuts let you perform any issue operation, including selecting an issue and ranking actions, without touching a mouse.
  • Drop zones indicate the available transitions when moving an issue.
  • Column headers stay with the board when scrolling down the page, so there’s no need to scroll back up to find information or take action. 
  • Issue cards have gotten an uplift: avatars show up indicating the card assignee, and the number of days in current status are indicated by dots across the card.
  • Columns can have both a min and a max constraint: limit the amount of work in progress (WIP) for each column to keep the team moving things along.

Keep Issues Moving Across the Board

We’ve added a new Control Chart to show the mean cycle time and trends. Control Charts, along with the “time in status” dots across issue cards, help teams spot outliers and understand which issues spend a long time in flight. 

The Rapid Board views are also available as gadgets, so it’s easy to display this information on a Jira dashboard or a Confluence page. GreenHopper 5.8 is a huge step forward in understanding your teams work andcommunicating priorities and progress to the rest of the org. If you aren’t yet using GreenHopper or you want to see the new features in action, check out the short overview video.

Upgrade Jira & GreenHopper

GreenHopper 5.8 is available today, you’ll just need to upgrade to Jira 4.4.3 to take advantage of all the great new stuff! After you upgrade Jira, search your Jira plugin manager for the latest GreenHopper release.

Topics: jira atlassian blog scaled-agile kanban upgrade control greenhopper jql rapid-board
3 min read

Version Control in SharePoint

By Praecipio Consulting on Sep 23, 2010 11:00:00 AM

 

Listen to the video or read along below:

Some of you may remember when shared drives were a revolutionary way of sharing documents throughout a company. Business documents were stored on a drive within a massive tree of folders that most employees could access. The problem with shared drives was that whoever edited a document last won – and by that I mean if Joe in accounting and Sue in management were editing the same document, there was no way for them to know if anyone else was editing it at the same time. So if Sue saved the document and overwrote it on the shared drive, and Joe finished and saved it an hour later, Joe’s version would become the document – and all Sue’s work would be lost, resulting in wasted time, wasted money, and…well, extreme frustration.

This is why SharePoint‘s version control is so useful. Here’s how it works in a document library. Click on Settings, then Document Library Settings. // Here, under General Settings, click Versioning Settings. // Here’s where you’ll set this up. Content Approval’s asking if you want to approve or reject submitted documents or changes – you would want to do this if you didn’t want everyone with access to the library to see approved, pending, and rejected drafts…for this example, I’ll turn this off for the sake of simplicity. Document Version History is want we really want here. I want a new version to be created every time I update a document – and I want the old versions of the document to remain available in case I mess up and need to revert to a previous version. Right now, No Versioning is selected – so I’ll change that. I can choose major versions or minor versions. I recommend major and minor versions for precision – if someone merely changes the punctuation in the document, I don’t want the document to jump from 2.0 to 3.0.

Below, I can choose how many older versions to keep on file. 2.0s and 3.0s are considered Major Versions, while 2.1.1s and 3.1.1s are considered minor or “drafts.”

Draft Item Security lets you choose who can see every version of a document. You can choose to extend this visibility to anyone who can read items in the library, to those with editing capabilities, or only to users who approve changes. I’m not requiring an approval process for this library, so I can’t choose the last option – but I’ll choose only those who can edit documents, since those are the people likely to be on the team with access to this library.

Lastly, Requiring Check Out is very important. Checking out a document to edit it tells the rest of the world you’re editing that document – if you don’t do that, you revert to the shared drive scenario I mentioned earlier. I’m selecting “yes” here to require my team to check out a document to edit it. You can learn how to check documents in and out in a separate videoblog.

So now let’s test this…let’s say we need to update our Worker’s Comp Form. I’ll click Edit in Microsoft Word – notice I’m “about to check out and edit this” – // and in Word, I’ll make the changes. Now I’ll check in the document – and notice it’s asking me what type of version I’m checking in. These were minor edits, so I’m checking in a minor version or draft – so I’ll select that, and let people know what I did…then click OK.

Now I can click on the Version History of this document and see my latest version here. If I click the drop-down arrow, I can choose to view or unpublish my version – or restore the version below. I can also delete all minor versions – all the small drafts – and keep major ones, the 2.0s and 3.0s, to make things simpler.

That’s the scoop on versioning. Visit our blog for more.

Topics: how-to library sharepoint videos control documentation microsoft

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