Our Ninth episode features Austin’s own Mark Garza, and we talk about the story and history of Flatwater Foundation and TYLER’S Dam That Cancer fundraising event, how digital technology has impacted non profits, and the amazing community helping folks find their Flatwater through paddleboarding, equine therapy, books, you name it! We also go over breaking the stigma associated with mental health support and how we can arrive there together. Oh, and the glorious food truck tortas that bless Central Texas.

Host: Christian Lane
Co-host: Garrett Dutton (aka G. Love)
Guest: Mike Garza

Flatwater Foundation provides access to mental health programs for those in need affected by a cancer diagnosis. This is accomplished by utilizing proprietary software and database management to allow direct access to traditional methods of counseling and therapy, as well non-traditional modalities.

The mental battle with cancer is overwhelming, as one diagnosis causes so many rough waves that extend far and wide. Flatwater seeks to support the diagnosed, their families, and loves ones to bring families back to the serenity of flat water.

Mark is the Founder of Flatwater Foundation. He is a graduate of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island where he studied Business and Modern American History. The Austin, TX native is happy to be back in his hometown with his wife, Jesica and children, Christian and Molly.

EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

KEYWORDS

people, austin, therapy, families, therapist, cancer, paddleboarding, years, pandemic, community, amazing, event, build, texas, foundation, grow, friend, sessions

SPEAKERS

Christian Lane, Mark Garza, Katie Thomas, Garrett Dutton

Katie Thomas  

Welcome to the Digital Transformation(ists) Podcast. On today's episode, we're joined by the amazing Mark Garza, founder and CEO of Flatwater Foundation. We'll hear the story and history of Flatwater Foundation and the Dam that Cancer! fundraising event, how digital technology plays a part in Flatwater Foundation's day to day and long term goals, the community dedicated to helping folks find their Flatwater through paddleboarding, equine therapy, books, you name it, and the future of breaking the stigma associated with mental health support and how we can arrive there together.

 

Christian Lane  

Mark, welcome to the podcast, man. It's good to see you. 

 

Mark Garza  

Oh, great to see you, thank you so much for having me. 

 

Christian Lane  

Definitely, by way of introduction here. Garett Dutton, This is Mark. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

Hey, Mark, good to see you, man. Thanks for joining us. 

 

Mark Garza  

Hey, Garrett, great meeting you. Thanks for the time. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

Are you in Austin, Texas right now? 

 

Mark Garza  

Technically, I'm about 30 miles north in Georgetown, Texas, just outside but yeah, we are in Austin and based in Austin and in loving it, enjoying it, I'm sure you know the city a little bit.

 

Garrett Dutton  

What an amazing town.

 

Christian Lane  

So Mark, I discovered the Flatwater Foundation through your big fundraising event, Dam That Cancer and I think I saw it in an Austin Monthly advertisement. And then it also happens that I'm friends with Ashley Elder who was on your board, I think at one point or another: amazing human being. And I figured if Ashley gives a thumbs up on a foundation, like you're it's gotta be an amazing group of people. 

 

Mark Garza  

Oh, yes. Ashley is incredible. 

 

Christian Lane  

Yes, such an amazing human. So I got to participate in the 2018 event. And then a fundraise in 2020. But 2020, obviously is a different year than other years. Your Foundation's amazing, there's a great story, we're looking forward to hearing your story on it. But for those that are listening, you're including into the support you provide your benefactors, effectively psychological counseling, as well as an integrated approach to wellness via access to yoga, meditation, group exercises and personal training. It's amazing how well rounded y'all are thinking in terms of that. But I guess, I don't mean to step on Garrett here, but I'm kind of flowing here. Tell us about the foundation.

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, so you're right, all those things are integral. But really, we started Flatwater Foundation here in Austin, Texas in 2010, because there is such a need for access to the mental side of cancer diagnosis, mental support, and people just were not getting it and still are not getting it, it's still a struggle. So Flatwater was started to provide 100% paid access to families touched by cancer diagnosis. And that's not just the person diagnosed but also family members. And those around it because what the name comes from, as we say when a diagnosis is introduced, a lot of waves kind of crash across a big community. And our mission, our vision is to bring these families back to what we call this serenity of flat water. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

And, it must be just extremely rewarding to be able to help people through this and I know that you've been through this yourself. And, that was when your father was diagnosed, right in 2009?. And from that, what I gathered, you kind of found paddleboarding as an outlet as a meditation to kind of help you cope with the struggle that your father was going through and your family was going through. Can you just tell us a little bit about that very personal meditation and exercise thing? Just something and you clicked and then they found a larger calling even outside of your own family? 

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, absolutely. So, I gave you kind of just the the, quick background, sort of the more of the what we are and the canned response, but what I'd love to do is take a step outside of that and really, really have a conversation about what's what's important here and that's taking care of the head, right mental health, taking care of your brain. So I did you're exactly right, Garrett, I went through this and found out my dad was gonna die. Like in a nutshell, I'm the youngest of four kids, and up until the age of, I was around 33 at the time and years ago, you had gone through life with good news and doing well and successes and winds and stuff along the way, and I was very blessed, very fortunate, but to get to something like that, and you're done. is kind of brings everybody to the table. And we were living all across the country at the time or kids and kind of explained, but in a really weird way, what's going on with him and PSA and all this stuff that we had no idea what any of it meant. And so we kind of crashed into different directions. And maybe my mom and brother, my two sisters, and just find ourselves in this struggle that's happening every day, many times a day all over the world. The mental side of it hit me and everybody else really hard. Fast forward, I kind of found myself on a paddleboard in Austin, Texas, it's kind of become a hotbed for it. But in 2009, this sport had just arrived. And a friend of mine was opening the shop and gave me a paddle board. So getting out on the water every morning at 9am, 6am, 5:30am, like just getting out before work if I can. And, yeah, found what you said, man found this accidental meditation, this level, this calm this mindfulness. I wasn't practicing meditation actively and just kind of accidentally found myself in this, in this moment, this low. In the winter, they would be these little wisps of, kind of odd two inches above the lip of water, that would just whisk off the board. And it just was the sign that I was doing better. And I felt great. And I was taking care of my mind. But something was missing. And I needed maybe some professional help. And that that sort of path to finding a therapist was so hard. And so confusing. Got to the point, I found a therapist and got there and it's hard to figure it out. And then once I did, it wasn't till I was in the session, I found out it was going to be 140 bucks an hour, , for a 15 minute session. And so yeah, through that whole struggle, I really found this was going to be a challenge in time. So my mom going deeper into it. How's your dad? How's your dad? Right? That's fine. He's dying. But my mom hit harder than I could have ever imagined. So anyways, the aha moment this therapist I couldn't afford to see he called me back and said, Hey, what, I'm sorry that you couldn't continue booking. There was something about you, Come on in, there's something about you don't worry about the money. I need to see you, I need to talk to you. And this is , just about a decade ago and man that that boom that that session was like a USB drive in my neck. I always say that. And she downloaded what was going on and spit it back. And I was ready. And I could not wait to get to the next Thursday, and then the next Thursday. And she said don't worry about the money, man. And that was it. I knew this is it. If we could remove that barrier. It should n't have to be like this. We can change lives. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

You still see her? Sorry? Sorry, Chris.

 

Mark Garza  

It's a great question. I don't I don't in that question reminds me that I need to shoot a text of gratitude her way, and maybe give her an update. I do see a therapist still. We were founded in Austin, Texas, based in Austin, our offices for the pandemic. We've let go of that to slim our costs in the office. And so I'm working out of my house. But we still do work out of Austin, Texas are based, but I live outside of town. And we'll probably get into it. But I've also started to embrace teletherapy as well.

 

Christian Lane  

Well, so I kind of touched on some of the things that you've integrated effectively into the program so to speak. Great. I've heard also that there's a Quine element to this, which is so cool. Can you tell us more about that? As I spoke with with her this morning, Lindsey, Lindsey and Alyssa

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, Chelsea Hardee and myself. So there's two of us; there are only two full time employees at the foundation and Chelsea years and years ago. We both understood the power of equine therapy and animals in equine assisted counseling. And she we kind of had gotten together and had this idea in this concept and met Lindsay through her husband who is a member of a band a two person band called Black Pistol Fire, shout out out the Black Pistol Fire and crazy small stuff and we have Black Pistol Fire play our little rinky dink party right in the parking lot for they're all over the world and, and her he's like Kevin's like you gotta meet my wife. He's doing equine therapy. And so we really had a lot of meetings, built the program, and I went through it and I was in tears just bawling. Because I was going through I was going through with my dad, I saw the power firsthand. LC was meant a lot to her. She'd grown up around horses and, and we thought, wow, this is something we really need to integrate. It's exactly what we do. Same core, core program, same core mission. But sometimes talk therapy doesn't work. , it isn't what you need, will don't want to maybe it's a whole family. They don't want to sit with a counselor. And this was it, man. We could talk for hours about it. So well. Yeah, that was it. And, that was about seven years ago. And to this day, a lot of that most of the people that want to tell us about their success and their testimonial because it's all all anonymous, not because they're stigma, but because, HIPAA, we keep it, we keep it private, but they come to us and like, I gotta tell you about equine. So really cool. It’s not horse riding, they're not on the horses, it's all energy work. It's all, around the horses and the power and the humble, or the motion.

 

Garrett Dutton  

But when you have a family that you're trying to help through the struggle, right, yeah. First of all, are you helping? are most of the families like in Texas, like around Austin? Are they around the world? 

 

Mark Garza  

That's a great question. So the need is just, hundreds of millions of dollars worth of therapy needed, right. And so because because of our location in Austin, Texas and Central Texas, we knew that, we're a small organization to people, we could grow it to 1, 2 million do we could do we are focused on the greater Austin area from sort of the Georgetown area down to say, Marcus and Buda, south of town. But here, the five and a half million dollars of work we've been doing has been tailored towards the Central Texas, greater Austin area, and it's just a scratch on the surface. Man, it's, we want to set an example we want to inspire but we're hoping that we're making an impact in especially on stigma worldwide.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Absolutely. So then do you then have a network of kind of therapists and like a client therapist? And if so, do you have a network? Kind of?

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, that's, that's exactly it. That's exactly what is here. It's our Flatwater network, um, when I started it, so we have one equine therapy program, and it's a little more specialized. And we have some limited referrals into that because it is a little more specialized, and it's half an hour, 45 minutes outside of town, and they have some smaller capability for capacity. But what we've done is we have, so when I started this, it was like, with at the time, Doug Allman was at LIVESTRONG, and he and I were college buddies, he was the CEO. And I went to him just when I was going through this, my dad was like, wait, people, that's when I discovered talking to him that like people could get, you're building a navigation center, they could get four or five sessions. And then I started to go beyond that and find insurance and other things. It was like you were limited to five, six sessions. And that's like, when it is two months. This is cancer, it's like going away, like, right, it's gonna come back. So it just didn't make sense. So, we really knew that we needed to do something about it. And I thought, well, what if I dedicated myself, I told him like, what if I just personally was just me, and I was a volunteer, I had a full time job and advertising was like, I use my marketing skills to raise money, and we'll pay the bill for people who want to get therapy and they're like, okay, yeah, sure. And so I went to the LIVESTRONG and said, their counselors and said, Hey, man, you must have hundreds of counselors that they send me people send me people, and they're like, will do handed me a stack of business cards and say, there are some counselors and say, we'd love to help people that come to your office and said, do you send anybody and they said, No, it's too expensive. And that was the theme. That was the theme. It's too expensive. It's too expensive. And people are going through cancer and bankruptcy. money has gone up if you had ripped away so started with that stack of business cards. And I built the network as we call it now. And what it was was a spreadsheet and I went and met with them, I saw their offices check their kind of hip, their privacy, parking, ADA compliance, is it a place I would go , it's like, get a great deal about it. So if I felt great about it, that's all I knew that I wasn't a nonprofit executive man. Like, I was just gonna build it and was a volunteer and, oh, it grew. And it was a spreadsheet with 10, 15, 20 names. My made up slogan was send us the bill. Send us the bill. Like that's all it was me and I would check the mail. And it was out of my townhouse. And I would get the bill and I would go to the funds and I would set up we were 501c3, everything like my father who was dying and then passed headford 20, 25 years running nonprofit doing dentistry. Christina Smile, he was a dentist, and he had performed he was doing about 28 million by the time he passed in, in an unpaid for, unpaid services and dentistry. Yeah, we built the first mobile dental offices in the back of 18 wheelers. I don't tell that story enough. Yeah. So that was what my dad was doing and so I'd seen it done and he helped me form it and you did everything right. I lost order directly. So yeah, we built it up and that was a long way around the corner there guys. Sorry, but the story behind.

 

Christian Lane  

 It was a good walk, it was a good one. Yeah.

 

Mark Garza  

Excellent. Excellent. So today, we had been inspired by my father who was dying. And I knew these people weren't going to get help if he passed, and we need to help more people. So yeah, that network grew and, and, and it was just a spreadsheet that we said, okay, people do not need to call Mark, they don't need to call, quote, unquote, the Flatwater number, I'd need to partner with people that know these families that are working with him every day, day in, day out. And so Texas oncology here in Austin, of US oncology, was a great place to start the LIVESTRONG cancer navigation center when it was still in existence. They changed that a bit now, but Wonders and Worries is an organization that does care for the families of the children of families of diagnosis. So nobody's been taking care of the parents. And so we started there and empowered them with access to the spreadsheet. But as you know Christian, you can't operate and scale off of spreadsheets. No, yeah, but that's it. And that was our network and our network of 15 became 150. And, and yeah, that's, that's exactly exactly what we do with the network.

 

Christian Lane  

So the universe gave you amazing ingredients, inspiration through your father's history of doing something to help other people in the world of health. Right. And you just did amazing things with it. And I know that it's taken an amazing team. And, at the moment you say you're full time wise to have you like Chelsea's like a rock? Like, absolutely.

 

Christian Lane  

I mean, like, I mean, I'm outside looking at Of course, but everything that comes through y'all, everything that comes to her communications, also because I received more of her communications. Right. Her handles are amazing. Yeah.

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah. Excellent. So yeah, we have, there's two of us. But the Flatwater Foundation, I like to say is actually what we call the Flatwater family is a couple 1000 people, like yourself, included paddlers, past paddlers, donors, some even 1000 donors, but really this core family, these people that have done our three or four months, pre pandemic, it was a lot more community focused. And, we'll get back there. We've made some big changes, but , those people plus we've got these 150 therapists, plus we've got , these 50 some odd partners and local cancer organizations. It just so happens, these people are and the therapy is all paid for. It is all paid. None of this is volunteer and free. We don't use the word Free ever in our messaging, because then it proves its value. It's worth so much. But we pay on behalf of the families going to care. We pay for their bill. So it's not just two of us. It is an army and Ashley has also hooked us up with some volunteers and, and others.



Mark Garza  

But yeah, we tried to keep… I come from ad agencies in the community communications background and yeah, Chelsea’s come from it as a professional athlete. as a professional pole vaulter and sponsored athlete. So we use our strength, sponsored marketing.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Right. So just kind of along those lines. Christian was saying that, your board is amazing. And obviously the Flatwater family has touched a lot of people through the dam, that cancer event, yeah. And that's a real community builder. Yeah. So I imagine a lot of the team building kind of happens organically from people kind of being passionate as sharing, the joys and and the victories that you guys are able to help bring to people. But can you just talk a little bit bit about that about the team building?

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, yeah, that's exactly it. It's completely organic. It's not like, hey, come join the club. It's a club that like I started to find out about, because I made myself really vulnerable. really early on, it was about kind of being vulnerable and telling my story and trying to be like, Look, I got hit with this sucks. I needed this. I needed therapy. I still need therapy. We all need therapy. I'll admit, I don't do enough of it. Like, I don't. I need to take care of myself even more. We all should. So the community came. Just, for example, I had friends around me every single day for 10 years I've been back home. I was born and raised in Austin. And I lived around and traveled to work and York and San Fran so I'm back home and I was friends. I've been around all my life. Once I started this, I started to find out Hey, dude, my dad died from cancer too. And I'm getting emotional because I'm thinking in my head, I'm thinking about specific conversations. Yeah. And I have no idea. Wow. And then even even, even last year, 10 years into randomness. I have a friend that I grew up with Back from kindergarten that is still in my life back in my life. And is like, Yeah, man, this means a lot because he lived with my dad when I was little. Oh man. So that club of all these people that wanted to be the worst club you ever wanted to be in man, people that have lost their dad way too early, but then also just people that were diagnosed and people that have been through this and people lost the mother mouse. They all started to really gel and it was because I had that experience on a paddleboard, and I decided,  what, let's go take this 21 miles on Lake Austin and go do this with 12 of us just to get on the radio and the news and talk about it and TV. Why are you doing this walking on water? What is his paddleboarding? It was in California, we were in Austin, and people had never seen this. And so it worked. And that message got out. And not only did we hope to move the needle for stigma, but other people said, I want to know about this. I was getting emails from all over the country quite. Hey, I saw what you guys just did. And I want to learn more. And so anyway, Ben Cortez used to live in Austin, was in Hawaii and ready to get some professional surfers and stuff involved. We did put them out like just this is incredible. It's happened so fast, man. Wow. And, and so yeah, it was like this community of people that were dying to have a fun conversation around surf paddleboarding, sports, water, sports, coffee, whatever. And in and create a marching army that every year became a fundraiser. And then the week after that first stunt, where we paddled 21 miles with some friends and a radio DJ, , babies and Jamie and Sandy and people with reach and frequency. And a week later, we had a nonprofit 501 c three submitted an organization with the Secretary of State in Texas and, and new Indian to make that an event. I knew that that could be an event that we could use, I have no idea what it would become, maybe racing dollars to to pay for this, and that, that became the core of the community. But we now do marathons, runs, walk fishing, anywhere you can find your flat water , like we can you can anything you do read a book, or whatever it is that you do that meditate yoga, mind Flatwater that's why we integrate those other things. Exactly.

 

Christian Lane  

Yeah. So in the world of, I'm gonna get this to some techie stuff, in the world of software development is called Agile. And in that, there's a lot of talk about ceremonies and rituals. In the Flatwater Foundation, if you ever go to an event and paddle it, it's beyond words, amazing and beautiful, the interactions. And a lot of those, I think the rituals that have come in the in the annual event are the very same things you shared with us around, make you put yourself out there being vulnerable, writing people's names on your arms, and like, share with us some of those rituals of the Flatwater, the actual Dam that cancer of that, because it's so beautiful. And for those that are listening, go to the website Flatwaterfoundation.org, and see the pictures that the team has shared of these events to me, yeah,

 

Mark Garza  

Tylersdtc.com, you can check out sort of the recap from this year, which was a strange and different we had to do that was 15, seven person sort of seven or eight person small dtcs, with masks on shore, totally socially distant, like 60 of us had to go virtual. It was it But anyway, it's still very moving. And through the pandemic, I'm very careful. I'm a safe guy here. I've got bad asthma. We had epidemiologists in the city, and we had advisors and we did it so clean, the geologists joined us out there and we just separated everybody. So thank you, I appreciate that. Yeah, it is. Sharpies, the Sharpies is a big one. And every year , we've been doing this for 10 years. And every year people do something laminate laminate photos of all the loved ones that they want to honor and somebody else picks that up. And then 10 people and then 20 people writing the names of who you want to honor all over your body and a sharpie for the day. But the cool part is, in past years all the people you have to hand a pen to somebody else to write on your back and write on your legs right on. So you literally have to physically go through the ritual of saying hey, Christian, would you write my dad's name on my shoulder. I'm getting emotional thinking about it because

 

Christian Lane  

Oh, it's moving man. It is. Yeah.

 

Mark Garza  

And then and then getting on the bridge. We started this thing called a low water crossing bridge and stand on a bridge within, with the national anthem. But years back, we lost a very close and dear friend that live sort of in that community. And we started to bring flowers down and holler out the names of people we wanted to honor and toss flowers off the bridge. 

 

Christian Lane  

I live in Apache shores by the way. 

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, exactly. That's love. And so yeah, so it would throw him in the water in his backyard right now. Right there. We throw these flowers in, and then get some obviously extra flowers that we would throw in and just have everybody start yelling the name out loud into the air. who they want to honor. And so the next 10 hours, that kicks it off, opens the doors and really flourish. But the next 10 hours, you don't even realize, Garrett, you won't even realize you paddled 21 miles over 10 hours because people are talking, hearing their stories Hey, Me too, me too. And, and just getting to know each other, and it's tough. It's tough. It's hot. This year, in October but it's hot. And it's hard. But, but but the vulnerability is the walls are down, the community is stronger.

 

Christian Lane  

But , it's amazing. 21 miles long distance 10 hours is a lot of time. But there's a lot of time to reflect and really just, set your intention. And I gotta say it's very energizing. When you hit some of those corners, you start hitting those headwinds. Yeah, those are tough man. I tell you that that energy that you harness that you kind of build in that morning, and in conversations really carry you through, and it's amazing of the community feeling it as well.

 

Mark Garza  

I am glad to hear that. I love to hear that. There have been years that the struggle has been so hard I've been scared. Those are my people, 200. That's my family responsibility. Yeah. And it's scary. And I've been in tears before with white caps in our face and falling down, people fall off their boards. But it always seems that the harder it is, the happier everybody is when it's over. But the more proud and excited people become. It's never not exciting at the end, but we always prevail. And,  we don't always make it through on the other side, and people run out of time with cancer. And we don't shy away from that one bit. But we have to celebrate everything we're doing to help them and get them to a better place, if possible.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Want to kind of go back to something that you said earlier. And that was kind of about one of the core missions, which was I mean, what did you say it was? like trying to take away the stigma of therapy and mental health. I mean, can you just talk a little bit about that? Because I feel like there is such a stigma attached to that. In a lot of families like yeah, I think like in our family, even my oldest son has had quite a lot of therapy growing up. And he's kind of the only person in our family that has had therapy knows kind of thing like you don't get therapy, which is obviously like a really stupid thing to feel but I feel like a personal thing. Yeah, like so. You must deal with it all the time. Yeah, people are like, I don't need that. Yeah, no, I don't need it. Yeah, your shoulder everything so yeah, just talk about Yeah,

 

Mark Garza  

I'm the son of a stubborn, tough love Hispanic man. Yeah, so um, yeah, that's real. That's very real near you. You hit the nail on the head, man. So basically, like, what it all started was about starting a conversation and by starting a conversation, simply a conversation through paddleboarding. For example, starting conversation on news, we could move the needle a little bit just to get people talking about it if we were on the news, and then the new story was about like, why mental health is important around a cancer diagnosis. It was really more about why mental health is important and taking care of yourself. And then cancer was what I was going through in my life. It wasn't about me. Yeah, it was just about people needing to take care of their heads and their minds. Well, stimulus, whatever the circumstance, yeah, getting through life. And I'm not a mental health professional. Every meeting I have, every time I talk to a counselor, I am a guy who was told your dad is going to die and struggled through it and then realizes we could put something in place to make it easier for people to get help. I'm not a therapist, business, ad guy, whatever you want to call me. But for 10 years now I've run a nonprofit that is making that happen. So yeah, it was moving, starting conversation and moving the needle. But I realized very quickly here that if you create all of these amazing paid for opportunities, open all of these doors but the people in the hallway are always going in the door. If they don't feel like they need to, we can completely and totally build the amusement park but nobody was going to be on the ride. If we didn't start to tell them about how awesome it was a while mission, in the money in the dollars that we raise those all go to pay therapy for these families that are diagnosed in our match through our network. We've been hit hard with a pandemic. We had to push pause on new placements in the care for a while. We still are paused while we have 350 people in families that are in care and 30 40,000 cash out the door we got up to where we were doing $120,000 cash out the door which is $140,000 therapy in a month. Plus the whole family and network. And so, um, yeah, I was just that with the event on hold we had a $1.2 million deficit. Right. Yeah. And so what? Sorry, go ahead.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Sorry. I don't mean, I guess you kind of touched on earlier. But yeah, so that basically with your medical insurance, just not get it people aren't getting out there might get some minimum. Yeah, therapy, but not adequate. Yeah.

 

Mark Garza  

So in a lot of times, insurance doesn't cover it. So how to qualify, when we are able to, and when we climb back, and we were made heavy, heavy headway. We still need help, we need a lot of help to get there. Just cancer doesn't go away. So we went from this insurance might do four or five sessions. And when that's what that triggered that is those four or five sessions, and then you're done. So the criteria for getting in is that you couldn't otherwise afford the care yourself. And it's you're seeking this help, because cancer of cancer has affected you. So if we empower our partners at Texas oncology wonders and worries, our, our referral partners, they know these families very well, know their finances better to make those calls. But they need to ask those questions like, could you afford this on your own? If so, let's look at those basic vehicles and your insurance model cover. Yeah, often they're left high and dry out the door, six weeks in seven weeks in. And so we keep people in their ongoing months, weeks, years. And so it's an , I told you that theme at the beginning was expensive, expensive, it's expensive. Well, yeah, it gets even more expensive when you say, I don't want to take this away from that's what's happening is people will go with insurance and start. So they do have insurance, the long answer is they can use their insurance and should use their insurance and be taken care of. But a lot of times that goes away and dries up. Or a lot of these folks just that were taken care of don't have access to that. So that's where the big gap is. And then when it's time to talk about mental health during a pandemic, right. Yeah.

 

Garrett Dutton  

So, so, um, I mean, God, that's, that's like a tremendous cash flow you guys have to have coming in and going out. I mean, seriously, especially if it's unlimited. Like that's,

 

Mark Garza  

yeah, once a week, we do limit it to once a week. So, but that's because we have to have breaks in place. And we do every eight sessions. We have therapy, we have the therapist check in and we have a policy where each eight it reminds them this is number eight. And so every couple of every couple of months, you're gonna let them know they can heal. That's not to say Hey, man, get your done. It's to say, hey, you can't hear because when I went through it, I was like, is this forever? Yeah,



Garrett Dutton  

Christian was telling me before we got you on the line today that some of your sponsors Yeah. to it. It sounds like you've just a wonderful group of companies. Yeah , so can you just talk to us about how you've teamed up with them, how you linked up with them, who they are and yeah, and what areas they were able to help?

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, it's been actually pretty cool. So we start by kind of like the overall branching and put it together and there's a company in town called Tyler's who if you've ever been to Austin there's a couple, there's places like Stillwater Oklahoma. You see Eskimo Joe's teas. I know you traveled quite a bit both you guys, specifically, these cities and you travel around to the city and people will wear a shirt from a city that has nothing to do with anything but it's kind of an icon in Austin. These are the shirts at Tyler's Austin Texas on the back and they're everywhere. Okay, and Tyler's is a T-shirt shop. It's a lifestyle shop. It's Billabong, Nike, Under Armour runs the gamut. And so I went in and said, the owner I was introduced to by now one of our board chairs, but a close friend of mine, and introduced us to the company and I said, Hey, I have an idea. There's a shirt. You guys have everybody in Austin wearing them. I've started this organization. My mission is to provide access to these families, they can't get help, they can't get mental health or counseling on therapy. Here's our logo. Here's our brand. This is what we do. And I'd love to take one shirt. These guys are selling 1000s of shirts a week  all over their locations. Now we've grown to eight but us the state of Texas and I said the owner I just I love what you do. I love your store and your vibe. I'd love to make our mission part of this lifestyle. It's college kids, young adults and get them thinking about therapy. Not just cancer but mental health and Flatwater and so maybe I can have one shirt. We can design it. Maybe some patients could design it but we designed it in all  just Tyler's blank shirt says Tyler's but that shirt will have Flatwater on its sleeve and he was like, I love it. That's great. Like, okay, so from there, it became a way to raise money. Then I said, Oh, well, I come back in two weeks. I have a major event that we do Dam that Cancer, I'd love to talk about getting involved as maybe presenting that event because we need to take it to the next level. Right? Come back on it. And so that starts there. And local businesses start to get involved and see the Hewlett’s;Volkswagen Hewlett Chevrolet, they do a branded, we do a track, we do a vehicle every year for four months. And so we started to get GM then we have General Motors and Chevy Volkswagen, and then it's like, the event grows. And fortunately I said, Chelsea was an athlete, and she was sponsored athlete, and I come from marketing. And so we start putting these. Yeah, I love it. Love it. So we start putting these partnerships in place. And then the natural ones come like actually as Christian or , aren't we workout at orangetheory Fitness or you go to CrossFit Central, and I was media. So I wanted to go to the magazines. And then I thought, once we get out there, we start putting together packets, and then the packets are what we can give. And so it's kind of a snowball effect, the more you can grow, and the more you can obviously get those eyeballs. You can talk to people about what you have to offer. But what I realized is this wasn't the same as my traditional world. There was so much more emotion involved and so much more tied to the motive. So a lot of times we'd have a sponsor that would say no, we have Rob who who got the years has gotten Rob cannon who'd gotten we start to sponsor for example was we've been through a few but we had Maui Jim involved we have Rob had his have rainbow sandals, we have Hari Mari shoes, the Hari Mari, but they come on. And a lot of these guys want to come on and support the paddlers in the event to get involved. But sometimes we'll have sponsors that will say, don't worry about my logo, or don't worry about my like, what do you need, we can hit you up and we can give them again. And it was just kind of flipping me upside down. Like No, no, we need to put your and they would be like okay, well you can put it on the website. But like, this is just so important, man. Well, my dad, I just lost my dad. And so I, I don't know I struggle to talk about this. But what really hit me is that the sponsorship side, I started to just get sponsors and meet with sponsors, but they all started to become sort of like me too. And I was like, Alright, well, let's work together on this. Let's figure it out. What can keep you happy? Get us out there. But more importantly, I just want people to know that you are supporting us. So we've gotten national, look at our list. And I mean, it's hard for me to say every spot. Don't get me started cuz I want to say every sponsor because they make it happen. We raised audited financials, we did like $164,000 in sponsorship dollars in support from sponsors. And in the year 18 would have been the most recent file we just did 19, 120 around 125,000 give or take 220, 425,000 in cost of fundraising. we exceed our cost of fundraising and event costs. We sponsor dollars so there's a surplus so that the money donated to our paddlers and our event participants 100% goes to therapy.

 

Christian Lane  

That's, that's an amazing stat to share. And I wanted to get to that talking about these numbers. I don't know what the benchmarks are out there for nonprofits and , cost of ghosts overhead expenses versus actual services. But y'all have done phenomenally well. You mentioned, you're a businessman, you've been in marketing, and you've pulled together just an amazing program. Thank you. What is the benchmark? Like what is a successful nonprofit in terms of expenses versus your actual service?

 

Mark Garza  

The first benchmark is existing after three years. The first benchmark is sort of that 80% attrition, like just not making it. And so that was really hard. That was really hard when, like

 

Christian Lane  

Other restaurants and businesses, you gotta hit that three, four year mark.

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, it's no different. This is a small business, I'm selling the mission, but there was it, it was volunteer the first five years I was a volunteer, so there's no staff and have it lean. But a lot of times, we will come to that 8020 8020 program, a program overhead ratio. And I had trouble with that for many, many years, , the first three, four or five years, six years, the overhead myth sort of, you have to hit this number. And you have to be there because as , Christian, you're a data guy, I process. Those numbers and those relationships really change and tweak at scale. And when you're really small, you have to get things done. You have to get things accomplished, but we didn't invest anything in human capital. And then we flipped that kind of switch where we had to get an executive director and right away we said well, we need to invest in Chelsea or , an events person because this is getting too big and and so we tried to struggle to hit those benchmarks but what happens and the reason why nonprofits go away is because There is a stigma. There is a myth around overhead about investing in capital having heard those numbers, because if you don't have the people to do it, you're done. You can't do it. So it was scary. It was hard, but we've done it and we twofold threefold , got it back. But so now we're at a 9010. I think at audit, we were at 8990 8911. Wow. And that's all changed. Like, that's all changed in this. It hasn't been not for the worse, whatever, but sort of this year shook us up, it shook everybody up. Because we have for five months with no fundraising. But uh, but we had to lower our expenses, we had to say no to people, which I've never, that's been very hard for my health.

 

Christian Lane  

It's stressful and you lose sleep over that kind of stuff. .

 

Mark Garza  

That's the exact phrase I use all the time. These bags are real. Had a baby. And I was like, Oh, no, this shameless plug for, dude, Dam that Cancer last year. So and then Chelsea had one the day after Dam, that Cancer this year, right. That's what we do. So anyway, yeah, man. It's, yeah, I could stop there. But it's, well, it's hitting those numbers and, and really not waste not being as efficient as possible. 

 

Christian Lane  

Well, I imagine one of the benefits you have is having founded in 2010. And running for a decade, you're operating in an age of very affordable SaaS platforms and software. Yeah. So where a legacy or older nonprofit may have just just heavy expenses on technology and apps and all that kind of stuff. Tell us about how that's helped you. Right, the fact that we're where we are in our digital kind of lifecycle, and then talk to us also about what you did in 2013 to scale.

 

Mark Garza  

I was gonna say that that was a big example. There's two different things there. One, one, we were early adopters, I I'm, I love being on the edge of technology. I am an early adopter, just as a hobby, if you will. Yeah. I'm an enthusiast. But so I

 

Garrett Dutton  

I had to

 

Mark Garza  

look around off the shelf, what's available off the shelf what we could do. So for example, we still use classy. We were one of the first Scott founders classy. In a pub, Crawford's mom started at built in software, we jumped on with him really early on. And

 

Christian Lane  

so as a fundraising platform, yeah.

 

Mark Garza  

So the fundraising platform that we use for our peer to peer, I believe had been gotten invest the investment from Salesforce now but so, but it seemed as though

 

Christian Lane  

It’s to help help people fund build teams and actually measure and

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, it came out of him doing a pub crawl for his mom and her diagnosis. And I didn't know that. And then we became friends. Then they fly out, hang out. Yeah, exactly. So anyway, we, we, I mentioned that because we're sort of grandfathered in, and we've goshi ation, and we've kind of had some leverage with them to stay where we are and buy down and, we're enjoying wholeheartedly, like I'd say we, , a lot of software, we're enjoying kind of rent control, right? We are still kind of working on a 2011 2012 sort of agreement. Because we, I mean, no exaggeration, but like, we got in early. And then we also when you get in early with software, you try to be a part of the solution. So the way you handle events, you can also with technology, you can be a case study, and you can be an example. And so if you have to sit you have to really stand up, yeah, there's feedback, we have to really stand up to that customer. And they listen, and they listen, and they've helped, they've gotten big, and as they get bigger, it becomes harder. But so for a lot of that, , we get calls every other minute. From software platforms and software companies that want to use there must be 1000s of them out there now doing kind of just that same thing with an exit strategy. But what we really needed to do was manage our platform, because we do one thing and that's cover the cost of therapy for these families. And there's nothing he wasn't gonna do it. Nobody was doing it for 15 therapists Yeah. And so I knew and I , I'll make this quick but I knew that we had to combine sort of our strengths, powerful community and donors, people that cared about what we did. asking somebody to raise their hand who in our community has project management experience in developer manages development found it a good friend of ours will came forward and he is a big donor and then also work in the field and then said okay, I can trust we can trust each other because your donor we can do this at cost do this at scale we probably for 20% of the of the full cost that would have cost us we were able to create on the literally a back of a napkin in a Starbucks Chris I kid you not like sketched out of Starbucks and Brody lane rodeo shopping center, drew it all out and said This is what I do. But what if we had a software program and a platform that this is like?



Mark Garza  

This was my first foray into building up an application, a web application. It's an sp dotnet. It's a dotnet app, I wouldn't have done that. What I know now, but it's powerful and does everything we need. And it's incredible. So we could scale out therapists on board and pay and keep them paid on time management, manage their invoices, their scheduling. And it's and nobody's doing what Flatwater does anything like it? So how are we going to find something off the shelf? Right? So fast forward, here we are in an age where we got to take everything we've learned, I think we're at the pandemic has given us a lot of pause for assessment, feedback and self self self review, and sure, looking at what our greatest assets are, and the software has so much more potential. And now we're looking at what we can do internally for Flatwater to make it more powerful, more robust increase in enable onboarding, so that a lot of what I do can be automated, from meeting with a therapist and all the intake and getting them sort of into the platform. And then also acth, transfers, money transfer, , payment gateways, handling payments and stuff, which we still do by QuickBooks and all that but we could automate. So using software I know enough, just to be dangerous is the phrase kind of like, I'm not a developer, I'm not a guy, but I think in process, so as long as we can find the people that can help us get that we can safely scale. And we've had, we've had some good success. So that's how you get to 150 therapists, and that's how you keep them paid on the day that you get paid.

 

Christian Lane  

And this is one of the number one things of business, pay your vendors, take care of your vendors. Yeah, I mean, effectively, these aren't your vendors per se, but they're the folks providing service on your behalf.

 

Mark Garza  

They Yeah, yeah, take care of them. And, and they, they, they love it, it's I'm amazed, we're blessed that come to me and say, when we when the pandemic started, we had a couple of them that said, I understand that we had to curb down their cap, we had to cap multiple payments, we had to figure out who was ready to be done off who could off offload, who could go less often, etc. And then we just had therapists that said,  what? I'm gonna keep seeing them, but I'm not gonna charge. Well,

 

Garrett Dutton  

yeah, I was gonna ask you about that. I figured that. If you were working with a group of therapists like that, there would be some that would start to donate and would have to offer a service, they have to get paid. They, ,

 

Mark Garza  

yeah, it's Yeah. And it's not sustainable. not sustainable. We knew day one that we are paying for this car. And so we pay $70 for a $140 session, we have a 50% scale, which means that $10 can become 20th. Donate 100, we can make it turn it into two. Oh, okay.

 

Christian Lane  

Cool. So, when you think about your, your software, your bad, how are you managing the product itself? , we talk about product management, how are you thinking and managing? Like what you want to build? How are you tracking that? How are you thinking about that?

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, so what we've built the platform, we had to build it as if we were, , had 500 therapists and we're a national organization. That was that was the value of the kind of that I went in. And so we built everything. So it would, it could scale nationally. And so the way it's sort of, it's sort of tracked, , I live in it. Every day, I watch it, I see, I know what my frustrations and my pain points are. And so I will be our project manager and I have a very close relationship because he was deeply involved in the cause he was many, many years live, a strong supporter and big Flatwater supporter. And so he helps me sort of manage the pain points and what can be fixed and what, what can be fixed and what could be left alone, because you have to remember, we spend as little to nothing as possible on overhead if it's not going to help us provide more therapy. And so that's really a benchmark for changes and updating principles. That's our guiding principle. But what's great is now that we've got seven years of learning on this, we believe there's a big opportunity to recreate, go down to the foundation, take down the studs, and do something incredibly powerful that I'm excited about, sort of foreshadowing there, but what our opportunities are as an organization, and I truly believe it's not about what Flatwater can do, just about what Flatwater can do for this community of families such by cancer, it's about what our whole country could do to enjoy technology that and easier, provide access, maybe for employees of companies to get therapy when they don't have any other means. And, , yeah, there's a lot of cool stuff out there but access is hard, the better helps and talk spaces of the world are in Thumbs up huge proponent that I talked to other heads of most of them and top employees that a lot of them in doing some information gathering on what the future

 

Garrett Dutton  

holds for

 

Mark Garza  

Telehealth, because I know that's going to be a part of our big part of our future. And then boom, pandemic, it immediately became a part of what we did. When everybody had to go Yeah, so, um, yeah, so I, I think there's a lot of exciting,

 

Christian Lane  

but one of the questions I was gonna ask was, , what's next, but it sounds like technology is a big part of what's next for the Flatwater Foundation and for you, and I gotta say, I'm extremely proud of your organization. And you and oh, man, you just did so many amazing things. And I think this community of Austin and Central Texas is a debt of gratitude to you.

 

Mark Garza  

So they the community deserves the credit like I'm just yeah, I'm a guy who, who, like I said, knows enough to be dangerous, but like, Yeah,

 

Christian Lane  

but it takes it takes someone to do it. Thank you. Yeah. Hard to get the ball rolling and, and you're running a business and I think Gary and I can empathize with the struggles and just burnout, burnout.

 

Mark Garza  

burnout is real, my friend. Yeah, I know, you can get to be HR and



all that.

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, fortunately, I have an amazing team. Like I said, the board, Chelsea and myself, but uh, no, it is man. It is. And I feel like a giant hypocrite when I run myself into the ground and take care of myself. Because it is hard.

 

Christian Lane  

Yeah. Yeah. It seems like it's your DNA and personality as well. , you can't help but be who we are.



Thank you. Yeah,

 

Mark Garza  

I'm just going to keep going. Round by amazing people.



Right on.



I appreciate that. Well,

 

Christian Lane  

oh, no, you're welcome. And thank you. So we'd like to kind of wind things down. A little bit of a speed round like,

 

Garrett Dutton  

Oh, yeah, I love it. Game Show style.

 

Christian Lane  

That's right.

 

Garrett Dutton  

You will preface it by saying you don't have to pick. We don't want you to lose any sponsorship dollars. Okay. But, yeah, so you can answer them however you feel comfortable. Oh, yeah. Yeah.

 

Christian Lane  

to, to quote one of the openings. I forget which song it is. I think I said let's kick it G Okay.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Can I take it? Yes, you can. Drive. Alright, so NRS or cruiser?

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah. a toss up.

 

Christian Lane  

Well, I mean, to that end, you got an amazing round the lake Lake, Lake Tahoe.

 

Mark Garza  

Oh my gosh,

 

Christian Lane  

I gotta get in on that. That's like, well, it's all my life goal. I got to tick that one off

 

Garrett Dutton  

So tightly around, you go all the way around. 

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah, let me use this opportunity to say that was a one off in the whole world that comes at me that wants to do that. So we did. We did 2015. We did 137 miles through Holland. 2015. We did. We did. We looped all of Lake Tahoe, on Tahoe sub boards. And then 2019 you guys we did 100,000 kilometers that we drove. And we did basically about 60 7060 miles or so across five different parts. We traveled the entire circumference of Iceland. Living and living in vans and inflatable overlanding

 

Christian Lane  

Overlanding. Yeah,

 

Mark Garza  

it was insane. So yes, we'll talk, we'll talk, we will try to change it up. But there's a huge ask for Tahoe But anyway,

 

Garrett Dutton  

Here's another one that you should think about, too. From Cape Cod to Nantucket.

 

Mark Garza  

I've heard this. I've heard this.

 

Garrett Dutton  

They had one. Yeah, you've heard of that?

 

Mark Garza  

I do. And I actually have a friend who wanted me to do one. I think Newport or, so I went to school in Rhode Island. I went to school in Providence so I know that area a little bit but uh, but dude, open ocean water...

 

Christian Lane  

Yeah not Lake Austin flat

 

Garrett Dutton  

Open water man. Yeah. So let's get back to the lightning round.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Dawn or dusk?

 

Mark Garza  

Dusk

 

Christian Lane  

Hunter or gatherer?

 

Mark Garza  

Gatherer, easily.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Favorite 90s jam. 

 

Mark Garza  

Dude, you would do that to me. Full disclosure, man. I'll be 43 this year.

 

Garrett Dutton  

So you missed the 90s 

 

Mark Garza  

No, no, no. I was in high school listening to Cold Beverages man.

 

Mark Garza  

I was in high school. No, I would say depends. So an easy one for me. The mood: if I want to celebrate and crank it up and blast my music in middle school I would be cranking black and white black or white Michael Jackson the whole Dangerous album. Okay hold the whole Dangerous album. But I have to go with On bended knee, boys the men.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Emotional. Yeah.

 

Christian Lane  

Let's see on the paddleboard topic: inflatable or solid hardshell

 

Mark Garza  

I'd go inflatable, newly I would turn that to inflatable after my life in Iceland traveling all over the country, there were 15 of us. We threw 15 catamaran style pontoon style inflatable boards into a cargo van with our team from Arctic surfers. We were able to do 15 of us with paddle boards in a van living in vans and it just opened up a whole new appreciation. Yeah, core inflation and deflation. Oh, it's an efficiency thing, Christian.

 

Christian Lane  

No. Hey, practical man. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

So now we're gonna switch to some more Austin based questions. Tito's or Deep Eddie.

 

Mark Garza  

Wow. Both huge.

 

Mark Garza  

Kevin Bart, and then all the Deep Eddie... And I have to say both of them have come out hard. Like we've got Yeah, we've got the Deep Eddie paddleboards out there. And we've got those boards out there over the years. Yeah, so cool.

 

Garrett Dutton  

I guess I should ask you: vodka soda or Martini.

 

Mark Garza  

So vodka soda is vodka Cran. So the funny part about that is we are very exclusive. Category exclusivity is something that has been very, very important to us. Brown distributing has come in and been the major sponsor of the party aspect, and has helped us with Land Shark. Real quick Land Shark came involved because I used to take Jimmy Buffett paddleboarding whenever he would, when he would go on the road. He would start in Austin. Yeah. And so a friend of mine, Andy, who got me who gave me my first paddle board, and he invited me to come along and we would take Jimmy Buffet. And he was a huge surfer of Montauk. Anyway he would love it, he donated to my Dam that cancer page. You just received a donation from Jimmy Buffett and I was just like all right, and we got Land Shark involved and they've been in but so but the the vodka and it's funny you brought that up because that's the only one where we were like, haven't really been too exclusive a year to year we are we don't have to lock this in one year. But both of those are so supportive.

 

Christian Lane  

Here's another local one for you. P Terry's or Whataburger.

 

Mark Garza  

Oh, p Terry's

 

Mark Garza  

Whataburger all day long growing up as a kid because P Terry's didn't exist, but now he carries spicy chicken sandwich is my jam.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Okay. All right, ACL or SXSW.

 

Mark Garza  

 ACL.  SXSW has just gotten to be, It's amazing. It's It's, it's, it's to see music like I imagine is SXSW is something that's become very important to us. And I've been on panels and for mental health and Flatwater. They've been very supportive. And I've gotten involved as a cause but to see music. It's much. So go early, go early to go early. Find somebody I mean, like you, be careful. I one a VIP ticket one year and it makes it hard to go back. But ACL is okay. It to not to not have that luck, but ACL All the way.

 

Christian Lane  

So this one might be for the old schoolers here. I think I know which way you'll go. It's more of a habit than it is preference. Town lake or ladybird lake?

 

Mark Garza  

Town lake.

 

Garrett Dutton  

A blues question Jimmy Vaughn or Gary Clark Jr.

 

Mark Garza  

Gary Clark Jr. Gary Clark Jr.I just have to say I'm more familiar. I know a lot. I know a lot more of this stuff. And I really enjoy it. No, no shade, no shade the other way around. But

 

Garrett Dutton  

And then the final question. 

 

Garrett Dutton  

Food Truck or restaurant? 

 

Mark Garza  

Food Truck. COVID. You get to keep your distance you get that? No. Okay, trucks. Um, yeah, I'm born and raised in Austin, Texas and...

 

Garrett Dutton  

a favorite food truck in Austin?

 

Mark Garza  

I honestly don't because my favorite thing to do with food trucks is find something different, like find a food truck. Okay. And so I try not to like, with restaurants I go to like, I'll go to P Terry's. Just like, P Terry's, P Terry's, I want P Terry's. Yeah, it's more like it's more of a discovery and they're coming and going and the best ones seem to be little taquerías that serve Mexican tortas, next to really shady gas stations? those tend to be...

 

Garrett Dutton  

Yeah,

 

Mark Garza  

Bread is right. Sauces, right, like a torta that like it like the kind that you'd find down on the Baja Peninsula in Mexico, like a nice torta next to the gas station.

 

Garrett Dutton  

I don't think that that's exclusive to Austin. That's like everywhere. That's such a good, good point there. That's great, Mark. So before we wrap up, can you tell everybody out there how to get how they can learn more about you on the socials and how they can donate to Flatwater Foundation and everything else?,

 

Mark Garza  

Yeah thank you for that. So Flatwater Foundation.org is our website and Flatwater Foundation.org/donate you'll find a few different ways via a part of what is called our mental health club, which is we're doing the club and $10 a month, or more whatever. We'd like to try to send out some fun prizes and stuff periodically to those crew or just a one time donation. Like I said, we're climbing back up to get to where $70 is $140 in care. So even just a $70 donation is going to provide an hour of life saving therapy, and sometimes it just takes that one hour. And then Tyletrsdtc.com. Christian shared all that exciting stuff about our event. See the recap from this year and learn about the people that did it. Tylersdtc.com and, and yeah, Facebook, we're on. We're on the Facebook and the Instagram @Flatwater and facebook.com/savethemind.

 

Christian Lane  

Awesome. Mark. Again, thank you for what you do for our community. Thanks for joining us today, G.. Always good seeing you, brother.

 

Garrett Dutton  

Thank you. Good to see you too. Christian. Thank you guys. Yeah. Hey, Garrett. Nice meeting you man. Keep up the great works. Mark. We're really, really inspired.

 

Mark Garza  

Thank you, man. I appreciate that. It's very cool to me. I'm a fan.

 

Garrett Dutton  

I'm a fan. I'm a fan. I'm a fan of you too! Take care, guys.

 

Katie Thomas  

Thanks for listening to the Digital Transformation(ists) Podcast, brought to you by Praecipio Consulting. Be sure to visit our web page to check out our other episodes, access show notes and links and listen to some great bonus content. Like what you heard? Subscribe, rate and leave us a review! And tell a friend, we love making new friends. I'm executive producer Katie Thomas. Victor Vargas is our engineer. Alejandro Caballero is our editor. Thanks for tuning in.

Christian Lane

Written by Christian Lane

With over 20 years of consulting, IT operations, integration, and software development experience, founder and managing partner Christian Lane drives the business strategy that has led to landmark company success. His experience in myriad industries including start-ups, utilities and commercial arts provided Christian a wide knowledge base of operational development. Prior to founding Praecipio Consulting, Christian gained respect in the technology field through his work with ERCOT and Tactica Technology Group (now Hitachi Consulting). Choosing a headquarter office moments from Lake Austin, Christian enjoys going out for "board meetings" (a.k.a. wake boarding) with our team.

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