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Stillness in Chaos

Sep 4, 2018 11:00:00 AM

Walking the halls of Praecipio Consulting you will often hear people talking about the cost of quality. One of the areas that we focus on with our clients is the cost of rework which is due to poor quality and can often be improved with a better process. While there are many reasons for poor quality, a common reason (which permeates all aspects of our lives) is rushing. One of my favorite YouTubers put it as "Never rush that which must be done quickly." You might ask what sitting in snow, or a survival skills/mindfulness youtube channel has to with the quality software, incident management, or any of the other high tech stuff we do. Especially when it comes to high stress, time-sensitive situations there is a lot to learn from other domains.

I was a waiter for about a month. More correctly, I was a terrible waiter for about a month. I never got orders right, I failed to bring second drinks, or really fulfill most customer requests satisfactorily on a busy night. I was ok at serving lunch and slow nights but I was easily overwhelmed by the volume of tasks that waitstaff has to manage. I often look back at that time for insight because I have generally been pretty good at most jobs but failed so completely at waiting tables. My core issue was that I was also rushing because I was in a hurry and that lead to decreased quality of service and longer cycle times. Because I rushed: I delivered the wrong dishes (or accidentally took dishes meant for other tables causing the rest of my team to fall behind too), I forgot that coke, I didn't split your check, I made the wrong change... And with each mistake, I had to stop, correct that problem, and leave my other tables with a worse experience too.

You can go a lot faster if you start with slowing down.

  

Topics: Blog

Written by Christopher Pepe

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