Blogs

3 min read

SharePoint 2007 vs. SharePoint 2010

Feb 1, 2011 11:00:00 AM

There are many long, thorough comparisons of SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 out there. This isn’t one of them. Instead, we’ve created a brief list of what’s new in SharePoint 2010, so SharePoint 2007 users can quickly learn about the advantages of upgrading to 2010 and weigh their decision criteria.

We’ll start with the “big” new features. They include:

Office web apps. Work together in Microsoft Office web apps (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote) simultaneously and see team members’ changes in real time. The web apps allow light edits to documents; document formatting and content are maintained when changes are made from the web.

Co-authoring. With co-authoring, you can work together in Microsoft Office applications and see changes from other team members tracked in SharePoint 2010-hosted documents.

Easy access to templates. You can access document templates stored in SharePoint 2010 via the New Document wizard in Office 2010 applications.

Reusable, content-based workflows. SharePoint Designer 2010 supports reusable workflows and workflows attached to content types.

Online presentations. Audiences don’t need PowerPoint 2010 to view presentations; they can see the presentation with high quality online.

Direct saving. You can save Office 2010 documents directly to the SharePoint 2010 document library from Office Backstage view.

SharePoint 2010 also boasts these new capabilities:

Read and write capabilities. SharePoint 2010 allows you to create web parts that read and write data to external data sources.

Web analytics. An improved set of out-of-the-box Web Analytics reports, offering insight into the behavior of your SharePoint users.

Full-fidelity mobile viewing. It’s much, much better than 2007 mobile views.

Editing to mobile. Perform light edits to Office documents from your mobile device via Office web apps.

Contextual ribbon. Customizable, context-sensitive ribbon menu atop each SharePoint page. Informative Slideshare from Shai Petel here.

Microsoft Silverlight. SharePoint 2010 comes with out of the box Silverlight web parts, making the inclusion of Silverlight apps much easier.

                                         Typical SharePoint 2007 view

                   Enhanced view in SharePoint 2010, with customizable ribbon

You’ll also notice these improvements in 2010 – along with many unlisted improvements that make some 2007 operations easier to execute:

  • Metadata/tagging at the item level; tag clouds; tag profiles
  • Keyword suggestions
  • “Ask Me About” web part in profiles (helps users find answers from qualified co-workers)
  • Noteboard (enables users to comment on any SharePoint 2010 site)
  • Recent Activities
  • Bulk check-in/check-out
  • Organization Browser
  • Enterprise wikis
  • Compliance everywhere
  • Flexible records management
  • Shared content types and managed metadata service
  • Content organizer
  • Rich media management
  • Word automation
  • Better support for accessibility standards
  • Search “in context”
  • Social behavior improves search relevance
  • Thumbnail previews in browser
  • KPI details
  • Enhanced filtering
  • Javascript object model
  • Powershell scripting
  • Better fidelity with Excel workbooks
  • Integrated filter framework
  • Improved visualizations

At this point, if you don’t have SharePoint and are preparing to implement it, we strongly recommend you go with SharePoint 2010. Not only is this important to ensure compliance and compatibility for the future, but it allows you to take advantage of 2010 features. If you already have SharePoint 2007, you could do fine without upgrading so long as you’re okay with lacking the social features, improved mobile access, and better cross-browser performance of 2010 – that decision depends on what you need/value technologically. If you have SharePoint 2003, upgrading is becoming imperative in order to stay above water, so to speak.

Webinars

Case Studies

Blog